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20121202
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with the fiscal cliff and dealing with our debt situation and not have a debt ceiling hanging out there as a diversionary but dangerous issue. but for some reason, inexplicable, the minority leader, the republican leader, changed his mind. now, he said on the floor well, important measures deserve 60 votes, but when he brought it up earlier, he acted as if he was in favor of it, he was offering it. and now, of course, essaying no, he's going to object to his own resolution. i wish he would reconsider. again, playing -- using the debt ceiling as leverage, using the debt ceiling as a threat, using the debt ceiling as a way to achieve a different agenda is dangerous. it's playing with fire. and yet, with the opportunity to take that off the table, reassure the markets, the minority leader blinked. i don't know why. it's hard to figure out the strategy that he's employing, but we would hope on this side of the aisle -- and i think i speak for all of us -- that he would reconsider and perhaps early next week let us vote on his own resolution. i yield the floor. mr. schumer: i notice th
of congress plus it puts the fiscal cliff and place right now and you lay it out i'm sorry, count me out. stacte want to take the first question? >> you raise a good point. this is where people's eyes glaze over. they can say whatever you want them to say. but the notion, i do think that there's been to the relationship between revenues and the titles and if we want to go bigger the better we need to push all of those, the smaller unit and the less you do on the other side, but there are some who say the idea of the american public is going to buy into this notion okay we are going to look devotees taxes go up so everything can be returned in a tax cut, and we go through this magical power. they are going to think 90% of the approval. so, you're going to have a general consensus. you do this year to get 500 of that in the interest savings alone. this should not be as challenging as it is. >> the other thing i would disagree about is the fact and i have been a huge jet kit and continue to be a huge advocate of tax reform debate and it's a critically important piece and i do think the noti
negotiations that are going on now and the fiscal cliff, but what's really important is that both senator baucus and his counterpart in the house, chairman camp work together i believe on developing ideas for tax reform will be some of the lead folks who are shepherding whatever kind of framework, hopefully comes out of the fiscal cliff to their committees to help develop the details of how to do entitlement reform and tax reform. so we are very like you have with us today chairmen bockius who is somebody who's been thinking about these ideas for quite some time, hazard immense amount of expertise and will talk to us today about where the situation stands and where hopefully we will be able to move from there. thank you so much, senator. [applause] >> thank you very much, maya. thank everyone here for fix the debt, putting the fix to get conference together. this is an interesting senate. have my back to all these a luminaries here. i don't know whether there will be darts in my back or spitballs, whatever it's going to be, but it's good to be here and try to help any way i can. i first w
the country goes over the fiscal cliff goes by, more and more republicans have joined our chorus. they recognize that the willing misto compromise sooner has put them in a real bind. so reasonable republicans are asking the house leadership to allow a vote on the senate-passed legislation. what was once a trickle has become more of a flood. last week republican representative tom cole said it was time to give middle-class families certainty their taxes won't go up by $2,200 on average on january 1. then tim scott from north carolina ad admitted that the senate-passed tax cut will surely pass the house since it will take only 26 republican ren votes for passage. i don't most of the time agree with david brooks but no one can dispute this columnist for "the new york times" is brilliant in writing. he's a great, great journalist and explains things so well. i really have great admiration for him. he wrote yesterday, "republicans have to realize they are going to have to cave in on tax rates." that's the way it is, mr. president. "they're going to have to cave on tax rates." then on
energy with certainty, both seconds. despite the looming fiscal cliff, americans are focused as we say, on the to do list. what do you consider of a most pressing economic issues facing the united states today, jobs and unemployment far and away number one, 30%. followed by government spending, budget deficit at 15. then back to wages at 11. so 41% saying either wages or unemployment, and then you see the government spending peace. if you look at how this breaks out by republican and democrat, independent, independent and -- they rank jobs higher than wages. if you look at republicans they rank spending as a deficit. when you go back to this idea of compromise what are you compromising about? these are very tricky times in terms of creating a working coalition on that issue. compromise, consider the economic challenges facing the country, which of the following actions do you believe do most of the country improve over the next couple of years? we read three separate approaches to this. number one was growing the economy and creating jobs. even to investments, even if that means contin
committee will be engaged in a hearing on fiscal cliff issues. we'll discuss strategies to create jobs, we'll discuss the implications of the fiscal cliff, and what happens if we don't get some work done by the house to pass the middle-income tax cut. we have to continue to focus on middle-income families, their lives, their struggles and what we can do to ensure they have more dollars in their pocket to continue economic growth. with that, mr. president, i will yield the floor. and note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. schumer: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new york. mr. schumer: i ask unanimous consent the quorum call be repealed. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. schumer: thank you, mr. president. first i want to thank my great colleague from pennsylvania, i enjoyed sharing a table last night with him and his beautiful, charming, intelligent wife, who he's lucky he would be the first to admit he's lucky to have married, and their four great girls. but second, thank him for his excellent, a
of negotiations over what is called the fiscal cliff. also, don't forget to explore the history and literary culture of new york capital city of albany this weekend. book tv is on c-span2 and american history to be on c-span three. >> coming up at 7:00 c-span will be lot of discussion unskilled immigrants. virginia senator mark warner is sponsoring a bill to allow more highly skilled veterans and to the u.s. >> we have had these this the five explosions of knowledge in madison, but we have not coordinated care. all the services that we have end up having some any cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. we have to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? and income on a global level where we doing some times? and, of course, now we have to these reports saying 30 percent of everything we do may not be necessary in after. we will be step back, 30 percent of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures. this is something, i think, which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the
to avert that fiscal cliff that we hear so much about. yesterday, after weeks of delay, and as the days dwindle and taxes are set to go up for millions of families and businesses, republicans in the house finally showed up at the negotiating table. and now we know why they've been holding their cards so close it their vest. their proposal would raise taxes on millions of middle-class families. their plan to raise $800 billion in revenue by eliminating popular tax deductions and credits would reach deep into pockets of middle-class families. republicans are so intent on protecting low tax rates for millionaires and billionaires, they're willing to sacrifice middle-class families' economic security to do so. at the first of the year, middle-class families, will get an average of $200 i,200 in additional taxes they'll have to pay. their proposal was short on specifics but we do know from independent analysis that it is impossible to raise enough revenue and make a dent in our deficit without using one of two things -- raising tax rates on the top 2% or raising taxes on the middle class. an
to conference and pass a defense authorization bill. we have time to debate and avoid the fiscal cliff. we have time to address a farm bill and dozens of others -- other important issues, and we have time to address the transcend ant issue of the universal rights of mankind. mr. president, i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from south dakota. mr. thune: i rise today in strong support of the legislation before us to enact permanent normal trade relations with respect to russia and moldova. this will put in place a new mechanism for combating human rights abuses, commonly known as the magnitsky bill. the economic argument for the legislation before us is clear. russia is the world's sixth largest economy. the world's fifth largest global importer of agricultural products and home to 140 million potential customers, the largest consumer market in europe. russia is already an important and growing market for united states businesses. of the top 15 u.s. trading partners, russia was the market where american companies enjoyed the fastest export growth last year at 38%. if we enact
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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